Monday, July 21, 2014

Large Hook/Large Needles

Want some patterns that work up at the speed of light?

Here are a couple of knitting patterns that are done using size 50 knitting needles.

Image of Fabulous Furry Scarf

This scarf uses two strands of yarn held together and is only seven stitches wide!

Image of Wee Warmth Baby Blanket

This baby blanket is done on the diagonal with 4 strands of yarn held together. This particular pattern has a few comments added by people who worked it up. They suggest some adjustments that will help you with the final result.

Image of Fast Finish Throw

This Lion Brand Yarn pattern suggests using 5 strands of yarn held together and casting on 34 stitches. That is pretty crowded on one speed stick (size 50 needles). If I were doing this pattern. I would use three or four strands.

Crochet patterns usually call any hook larger than a J, a large hook. Some websites pull up patterns for H, I and J hooks when you put in "large hook". When I crochet, I think P, Q, and S hooks are large. So, with that in mind, here are some large hook patterns.

Image of Crochet Catskills Jacket

This is called a Catskills Jacket. It is worked with a N/P hook and a super bulky (6 weight) yarn.

Basketweave Hat

Red Heart yarn has this basketweave hat for a size K hook.

Go Team Go! Baby Sweater

One thing to keep in mind about making an afghan or throw with a large hook. If you have a pattern that you like, but you don't want to work small stitches, get out the size hook that you prefer. You can make the same pattern with worsted weight yarn up to a size K - just remember to make fewer stitches in the starting chain. If you use a hook larger than a K, use two or three strands together.

If it's a repeating pattern, try to figure out how many stitches are in the main cluster/pattern (often between 3 and 12) and make a multiple of that number. Then add 2 or 3 stitches for a turning chain.

If you can't figure out the number of chains for the basic pattern, just make the chain longer than you think it should be. Work the first row as directed by the pattern and cut off the extra chain. I usually cut it off about three chains from the place where I ended the first row and unravel the last couple of chains so I have an end to weave in. The chain doesn't unravel after you cut it off. Just tug the end tight and it will be fine.

Happy crafting.

Kathi Linz

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